Tag Archives: hosptial

Hospital Duty: Dealing With Doctors (Part 4)

Communicate with Your Doctor

Communicate with Your Doctors
Photo Credit: Yuya Tamai

My goal is to talk to every doctor on the case at least one a day. This isn’t as easy as it used to be. In the good old days, your primary care physician or your specialist was in charge of care. You knew her, had interacted with him, and knew where to find her. No more.

In the hospital system Sis and Mom are in, a hospitalist has primary responsibility for inpatients, with specialists being called in as needed. Hospitalists are hired by the hospital and provide the first level of care for all of the patients in the hospital. They usually work 12 or 24 hour shifts, so your loved one won’t have the same doctor throughout his or her stay. But the good news is that there is always a hospitalist available if your loved one needs attention at midnight.

If your hospital uses hospitalists, your job may be more complex. I’ve worked with some who have been fantastic and true advocated for my loved one. But I’ve also worked with those who have clearly missed a serious problem, those who don’t want to “waste” resources on an older or seriously ill patient, and those who were less than caring. I’ve had to fight hard to get a CT scan and once Mom was discharged with a clear blockage in her leg that required readmission the same day after I observed the problem and took her back. I asked for a different hospitalist for the readmission…

I’m often able to get the hospitalists to agree to come while I’m there since they are in the hospital all day, unlike a primary care physician making rounds at a specific time. Specialists, on the other hand, are coming from their practices and they come when they come. However, I would ask them to give me an estimated time or tell each one when I expected to be there and many have accommodated me. I keep a list of questions for each provider so I can use their time efficiently.

By being the constant voice for the patient, I find that most physicians not only work with me, but even appreciate my participation as long as I don’t try to do their jobs for them. Again, the patient is usually too sick to ask good questions or remember what’s said. They need an advocate who is tracking for them.

Read Part 1 here, Part 2 here, and Part 3 here.