Tag Archives: ethics

Lethal Harvest: Fiction Friday

Lethal Harvest by William Cutrer and Sandra Glahn

Lethal Harvest by William Cutrer and Sandra Glahn

Lethal Harvest: A Novel is a difficult book to review without spoilers, so forgive the vagueness. It is a captivating medical thriller that centers on the disappearance of one member, Tim Sullivan, from a partnership running a fertility clinic in Washington, D.C. Sullivan is a nephew of the current U.S. president and, like him, carries a recessive gene for akenosis, a neurological disease that results in rapid deterioration of motor function. Unbeknownst to his partners in a DC fertility clinic, Tim is conducting research into akenosis using DNA implantation techniques. About the time the disease begins to affect the president, Sullivan’s car runs off the cliff.

Meanwhile, one of Sullivan’s partners confuses clones of discarded eggs (which, unknown to him, Sullivan was using for research) with the correct eggs for implantation. The twins that result develop confusing health challenges, resulting in a lawsuit, a bombing, and new challenges for the third partner, Ben McCay, an obstetrician and chaplain.

While there were some weak plot elements, including threads that didn’t seem to move the story forward and too much focus on the romantic relationship, these were overshadowed by the moral, ethical, and medical aspects of the book. It was a page turner. If you love medical thrillers, this is a good read. [Note: this edition of the book is an update of an earlier edition, which was a Christy Awards finalist.]