Monthly Archives: July 2016

When There Are No Easy Answers

When There Are No Easy Answers by John S. Feinberg

When There Are No Easy Answers: Thinking Differently About God, Suffering, and Evil by John S. Feinberg

We’ve all heard the stories. Some of us live them. How do you reconcile the worst types of suffering in life with the notion of a good God?

John S. Feinberg is one who is living “the worst” of suffering. His wife, Pat, has suffered from Huntington’s Disease, an incurable, debilitating, genetic disorder, for over 25 years. For many years, she has been unable to walk, talk, or respond. In addition, his children are at risk because the disease is genetically transmitted. Pat’s mother probably suffered from Huntington’s and the information was in her medical record, but was not made available to them until years after her diagnosis. So Feinberg, a seminary professor, was hit with not one, but several, tragedies–each one raising theological and emotional questions.

In When There Are No Easy Answers: Thinking Differently About God, Suffering and Evil (Kregel Publications), Feinberg uses his theological training and life experience to grapple with the many questions that suffering raises. The result is a raw attempt to make sense of the nonsensical. He tackles the character of God and the stupidity of friends. He offers theological assessments and practical tips.

I was especially drawn to this book because my husband has Parkinson’s Disease, and while he is still quite functional, I know from friends in my support group what most likely lies ahead. I strongly recommend this book for anyone struggling with theodicy – the question why a good God permits the manifestation of evil, for anyone facing personal or health issues they don’t understand. It isn’t an easy book to read, although it is quite readable. It will make you think, pray, and discuss. It will help you become a woman of splendor. And hopefully, will give you answers to make the journey a little more tolerable.

 

Lethal Harvest: Fiction Friday

Lethal Harvest by William Cutrer and Sandra Glahn

Lethal Harvest by William Cutrer and Sandra Glahn

Lethal Harvest: A Novel is a difficult book to review without spoilers, so forgive the vagueness. It is a captivating medical thriller that centers on the disappearance of one member, Tim Sullivan, from a partnership running a fertility clinic in Washington, D.C. Sullivan is a nephew of the current U.S. president and, like him, carries a recessive gene for akenosis, a neurological disease that results in rapid deterioration of motor function. Unbeknownst to his partners in a DC fertility clinic, Tim is conducting research into akenosis using DNA implantation techniques. About the time the disease begins to affect the president, Sullivan’s car runs off the cliff.

Meanwhile, one of Sullivan’s partners confuses clones of discarded eggs (which, unknown to him, Sullivan was using for research) with the correct eggs for implantation. The twins that result develop confusing health challenges, resulting in a lawsuit, a bombing, and new challenges for the third partner, Ben McCay, an obstetrician and chaplain.

While there were some weak plot elements, including threads that didn’t seem to move the story forward and too much focus on the romantic relationship, these were overshadowed by the moral, ethical, and medical aspects of the book. It was a page turner. If you love medical thrillers, this is a good read. [Note: this edition of the book is an update of an earlier edition, which was a Christy Awards finalist.]

 

Dwelling Places: Words to Live in Every Season

Dwelling Places: Words to Live in Every Season by Lucinda Secrest McDowell

Dwelling Places: Words to Live in Every Season by Lucinda Secrest McDowell

I was excited to be invited to review this book by Lucinda Secrest McDowell. I usually like her writing and I was ready for a new devotional. This book takes an interesting approach. First, it is organized by season, with a theme for each – dwell for fall, shine for advent, renew for Lent, and grow for summer. Then within each section, each day focuses on one word, finding the word in a Scripture verse. Interesting approach. Good potential. The layout is typical devotional: bible verse, narrative, prayer. The narrative usually offers a brief story or anecdote,  followed by some discussion of that theme.

Sadly, the book disappointed at every level. First, it’s unreadable and looks self-published even though it’s published by Abingdon. I know their goal – small format with each devotional contained on two facing pages. So the book measures 5” x 7” – a nice, portable size. But to accomplish the goal, they used what looks like about an 8-point font with 3/8 inch margins. Definitely not a book for anyone over 40! The paper is common newsprint.

Reviewers were asked to select a season to review. I chose Summer (grow). I love summer – gardens, vacations, family, leisure… Some of the words chosen fit the summer theme, but several were a reach. With few exceptions, I also found the narratives to be ho-humm. Not bad, but not underlinable.

All in all, this book was a disappointment. Look elsewhere for your new devotional.

Lucinda is sponsoring a drawing for some really fine prizes. Enter at https://promosimple.com/ps/9d4a by July 5. Winners drawn July 6.